2012-08-23 08.05.27

WHAT TO PLANT

Seed in Ground: artichokes, arugula, beets, carrots, chard, chives, dill, leaf lettuce, onion sets, parsley, potatoes, snap and sugar peas, turnips, winter hardy greens (bok choy, spinach, cress, mustard greens, collards)

Seed Indoors: basil, cucumbers, chard, eggplant, lettuce (head), melons, peppers, pumpkins, summer and winter squash (late), tomatoes,

Transplant:  asparagus (crowns), bok choi, broccoli, bunching onions, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, collards, kale, leeks, lettuce (head), rhubarb (crowns), strawberries, Swiss chard

***Brassicas like kale, collards, cabbage, and broccoli should have 3-4 true leaves and be about six weeks old when you transplant.***

WHAT TO DO

    • Feed the soil by applying compost to plantings throughout your landscape: trees, shrubs, lawn, and all garden beds.
    • By the third week of the month, plant potatoes 4 inches deep in warm soil.
    • Begin sowing seeds of leaf lettuces, collards, and other greens outdoors; for continuous harvest, repeat sowings every 2 weeks.
    • On Valentine’s Day, prune roses, clean up debris, and then top-dress the shrubs with fresh mulch. No roses? Plant some now!
  • Continue to shop local nurseries for asparagus roots, rhubarb, strawberry plants, and fruit trees.
    • Prune older fruit trees.
    • Plant spring flowers:  alyssum, hollyhocks, edging lobelia, rocket larkspurs, and Canterbury bells.

winter harvest

Here’s a wee little task list of what to plant and do around the garden during the month of January:

WHAT TO PLANT

Seed in Ground: artichokes, asparagus (crowns), beets, cabbage, carrots, celery and celeriac, chard, chives, dill, leaf lettuce, onions sets, parsley, rhubarb (crowns), snap and sugar peas, strawberries, turnips, winter hardy greens (bok choy, spinach, cress, mustard greens, arugula)

Seed Indoors: bok choi, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, chard, eggplant, kale, leeks, head lettuce, bunching onions, peppers, tomatoes, summer and winter squash (late)

***Brassicas like kale, collards, cabbage, and broccoli should have 3-4 true leaves and be about six weeks old when you transplant.***

WHAT TO DO

  • On nice days, prepare your beds if the weather is warm and dry enough.
  • Cover prepared beds with mulch or row cover (prevent erosion on bare soil!) until you’re ready to plant.
  • Shop local nurseries for asparagus roots, rhubarb, strawberry plants, and fruit trees.
  • Cover root crops still in the ground with an extra layer of mulch.
  • When cold temperatures are predicted, protect transplants of onions, cabbage, broccoli, and chard with a row cover.
  • Sow seeds of herbs, such as dill and parsley.
  • Sow seeds of annual flowers (delphiniums, snapdragons, and larkspur are good choices) anywhere you want flowers for cutting or as a background for other plants.
  • Plant even more flowers! Poppies, chamomile, evening primrose, calendulas, verbena, and daisies.
  • Top-dress lawns with compost.
  • And don’t forget to look after your perennials – most fruit trees need pruning in winter, before they start to bud.

Here’s a wee little task list of what to plant and do around the garden during the month of December:
WHAT TO PLANT

  • Seed in Ground: carrots, cauliflower, onions, chives, spinach, mustard, peas, beets, radishes, lettuce (somewhat protected)
  • Seed Indoors: bok choi, broccoli, cabbage, kale, leeks, head lettuce, bunching onions

WHAT TO DO

  • Plant flowers!  Petunias, calendulas, annual candytuft (Iberis umbellata), pansies, sweet alyssum (Lobularia maritima), cornflowers (Centaurea cyanus), stocks (Matthiola incana), scabiosa (Scabiosa atropurpurea), verbena, pinks (Dianthus spp.), and daisies.
  • Plant bulbs, corms, and rhizomes of iris (Iris danfordiae, I. histrioides, I. reticulata), amaryllis, anemone (Anemone coronaria, A. sylvestris), calla, and liriope.
  • Clean up garden debris to eliminate overwintering areas for diseases and insect pests.
  • Start to build beds for spring by adding lots of compost.
  • Plant bareroot trees, shrubs, roses, and vines.

Red Giant Mustard Greens at the Training Farm.

Here’s a wee little task list of what to plant and do around the garden during the month of November:
WHAT TO PLANT

  • Seed in Ground: carrots, leaf lettuce, kale, mustard greens, swiss chard, collard greens, bok choi, onion seed (early), radish, spinach, turnip (early), peas, Brussel sprouts, beets, strawberries, cilantro, fennel, dill, cabbage
  • Seed Indoors: broccoli, cabbage, leeks

WHAT TO DO

  • Fruit trees will arrive at nurseries for fall planting; shop early for the best selection.
  • Harvest cold-sensitive veggies—such as tomatoes, eggplant, and peppers—that you planted in July.
  • Under row covers, plant cool-loving crops, such as Brussels sprouts, cabbage, Chinese cabbage, broccoli, peas, carrots, kale, radishes, mustard, turnips, beets, and spinach.
  • Plant strawberries (‘Chandler’, ‘Sweet Charlie’, and ‘Sequoia’) so plants will be established by spring.
  • Sow seeds of poppies, larkspur, and delphiniums for early spring color.

IMG_20130416_183752

WHAT TO PLANT

Seed in Ground: basil, beans, corn, okra, peanuts, southern peas (black-eyed, purple hull and crowder peas), sweet potatoes
Transplant: eggplant (early), melons (early), peppers (early), squash, tomatoes (early)

WHAT TO DO

  • Harvest spring crops daily to keep them producing for as long as possible.
  • Continue to plant heat-tolerant tomatoes, such as ‘Heatwave’, ‘Sunchaser’, and ‘Sweet 100′.
  • Plant caladiums in shaded sites. Try narrow-leaved zinnia (Zinnia angustifolia) for hot spots. Give new plantings plenty of water.
  • Continue planting daisies, asters, coreopsis, marigolds, and sunflowers—they nourish the beneficial insects, which will help keep pests in check.
  • Check your drip irrigation system—you’ll be depending on it soon.
  • Pray for rain.
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